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The M-POWER project is partnering with cities across the country to turn the core vision of the IMF Diversity Initiative into a reality: improving the short- and long-term outcomes of African-American patients with multiple myeloma.

Multiple myeloma is the most common blood cancer in African Americans, who have a greater-than-average risk of developing the disease. But when barriers to early diagnosis and treatment are removed, African-American myeloma patients do just as well, or even better than, white individuals.

M-POWER is empowering health-care professionals, community leaders, neighborhoods and families to break down those barriers by raising myeloma awareness. Get M-POWERed to change the course of myeloma by clicking on a city below.

We invite you to visit one of our M-POWERed cities

Could Your Patient Have Multiple Myeloma? Don’t Miss the Signs

In this free CME series for Health Care Professionals, IMF Chief Medical Officer Joseph Mikhael (Professor, Applied Cancer Research and Drug Discovery, Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) at City of Hope Cancer Center – Phoenix) provides education for primary care providers and hematologists/oncologists on the signs and symptoms of multiple myeloma (MM) so they can remove barriers to earlier diagnosis and improve treatment in the African – American community.
Free CME

Addressing Disparities in Multiple Myeloma and the Path to Health Equity

IMF Chief Medical Officer Joseph Mikhael (Professor, Applied Cancer Research and Drug Discovery, Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) at City of Hope Cancer Center – Phoenix) discusses disparities in myeloma treatment and diagnosis, representation in clinical trials, the importance of achieving health equity, and what actions are being taken to do so.

Abstracts on Racial Disparities in Myeloma Care

IMF Chief Medical Officer Dr. Joseph Mikhael (TGen, City of Hope — Phoenix)  discusses abstracts on racial disparities in myeloma care as reported from this year’s American Society of Hematology (ASH) annual conference. #ASH21 #IMFASH21

Health and wellness matter to everyone, but it is especially important for patients with myeloma and those who care for them. Participation in a wellness program may help survivors and their caregivers feel better physically as well as improve emotional and spiritual well-being.

Explore the Mind and Body website to find wellness education, movement, exercise, and mindfulness practices tailored for patients and caregivers. Begin your Mind and Body journey now to self-advocate for your wellbeing.